How we turned GitHub Issues into a game

Our list of bugs was growing. Something drastic had to be done. So we built a game.

At Weld we’re building a code-free tool, but we sure are generating a lot of code. And a lot of bugs. Our issue list on GitHub was stacking up something fierce, and something drastic had to be done. Then someone in the team said:

“Let’s build a game!”

So we started looking into GitHub webhooks and how it could feed into another system. And we built a simple database where every action taken on a GitHub issue would be tracked and rewarded with a score. Also, since we are heavy Slack users we wanted to have a daily reminder in the morning on our Slack channel.

One challenge was how to reward different actions. Was solving a bug more important than reporting it in the first place? And if so, how much more important? We ended up with giving 25 points for filing a bug report, and 50 points for closing a bug, with extra multipliers for prio 1 and 2 bugs.

The result is the Bug Hunter Game, a simple web service build in Node.js. It listens to webhooks coming in from GitHub, and it runs a scheduled task every morning, posting a short message to Slack:

If you want to have the same, just fork our project and add your own integrations. I hope it will make bug hunting a joy for everyone!

Check it out:

https://github.com/weld-io/bug-hunter-game

I build tools for creativity 🧩. CEO of @Weld_io , a #nocode tool for marketers. Father of two. Feminist. Fan of espresso and movies. Still learning.

I build tools for creativity 🧩. CEO of @Weld_io , a #nocode tool for marketers. Father of two. Feminist. Fan of espresso and movies. Still learning.